Exhibition

Floralia at MoMu Now

Coat with hood in manmade fi bre with zip fastener and rayon dress printed with flower patterns, predominantly roses, Jil Sander by Raf Simons, S/S 2011, (c) MoMu Photo: Boy Kortekaas

Coat with hood in manmade fi bre with zip fastener and rayon dress printed with flower patterns, predominantly roses, Jil Sander by Raf Simons, S/S 2011, (c) MoMu Photo: Boy Kortekaas

Flower patterns are one of the most classic and popular patterns in the world of fashion: the romantic ideal of the ‘femme fleur’ (the women-as-flower), often encountered in the art world as well, is a favourite subject among many couturiers and contemporary designers. Christian Dior’s rose garden in Granville, Normandy became part of the house’s regular designs and patterns.

Ensemble with blouse and skirt in printed cotton, partly painted with tie-dye technique, the skirt decorated with appliqué felt flowers, Bernhard Willhelm S/S 2008, (c) MoMu, Photo: Boy Kortekaas

Ensemble with blouse and skirt in printed cotton, partly painted with tie-dye technique, the skirt decorated with appliqué felt flowers, Bernhard Willhelm S/S 2008, (c) MoMu, Photo: Boy Kortekaas

Raf Simons also incorporated the rose in his Dior collection. Flower patterns are not longer solely associated with romance, but are now also used for graphical prints on pieces of clothing as well, or as abstract application embroidery, making the clothing almost look like a modernist painting.