Collection

MoMu Digital Wall receives Henry van de Velde Label!

DigitalWall2

Last Wednesday, the prestigious Henry van de Velde Awards were presented for the 22th time by Design Vlaanderen in Brussels. Nineteen products and services of the past year received the Henry van de Velde 2015 Label, including our very own MoMu Digital Wall.


Design Vlaanderen, an organization promoting high quality and innovative designs in Flanders, has been awarding Henry van de Velde Labels to products since 2006. The Henry van de Velde Label appreciates and promotes innovative, well-developed and technically sophisticated products, objects or projects that stand out from others on the market. More than 200 products participated for the label.

DigitalWall1

With the support of Tourism Flanders , MoMu developed a digital wall of 10 square meters to develop its collection digitally. The digital wall was designed by David Dos Santos. The technical development was in the hands of Lab 101.

Behind the scenes, Library

Study Collection soon available at MoMu!

Studiecollectie MoMu

MoMu will soon launch an exciting new project! We have obtained a fashion and textile study collection with roughly 1000 objects for you to consult! The wide range of items will be made available and hopefully will provide answers to many of your questions regarding patterns, fabrics and techniques.

A large part of the study collection to date was donated to MoMu by Jacoba De Jonge, a private collector of historical costume and accessories. A large part of her collection was acquired by MoMu in 2012. In addition  Mrs de Jonge had a study collection that she used during workshops. This smaller collection of samples of fabrics, laces, embroideries, etc., also came to MoMu to be used for educational and research purposes. This was basis for a larger MoMu study collection that will be accessible for those who have an interest in fashion, fabrics and other textile related techniques.

 

Studiecollectie transport

To enlarge its study collection, and to provide a wider range of types of objects, MoMu engaged in a collaboration with the University of Antwerp and supported by the Flemish government. The training program for conservation-restauration within the Faculty of Design Sciences has many study collections, including one with costumes and textiles. This collection has a completely different content than the one from MoMu, hence the interest in a collaboration.

It was originally donated to the University by the Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.) in New York in 1994. Since then, it has been used by textile conservation students to practice the art of pattern taking and presentation, as well as preservation and conservation techniques. It consists mainly of Western clothing from the 2nd part of the 20th century and traditional and ethnical clothing from all over the world with, for example, a large collection of kimono’s. Some 300 pieces were selected to be included in the MoMu study collection.

Part of the MoMu study collection can already be consulted online through Open Fashion by selecting “Studiecollectie” . The entire study collection will be made physically available for research in September 2016. Leading up to that date, we would like to inform you about the educational importance of the study collections by introducing you to some of the objects contained within, and how they have been used by students at the University of Antwerp.

Words by Bernice Brigou and Natalie Ortega, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Design Sciences, research group Heritage & Sustainability.

Collection, Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent In The Picture: Morobe Shoes

Morobe

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Morobe Shoes

Morobe

Morobé is a Belgian shoe brand based in Antwerp. This luxury label is made for women who long for contemporary elegance and street couture. “With Morobé, we base our outfits on our shoes, not the other way around”. Morobé’s world combines bohemian vibes with rock & roll, giving it a unique and powerful image.

The brand was founded in 2015 and is inspired by the key words ‘Rime and Rove’. Virginie Morobé, designer and owner, feels these words express perfectly how she has grown over the years. ‘Rime’ refers to an evolving state of being: “This new shoe brand is a more mature, more complete version of who I am. During my creative process, I remain very aware of my inner self. I trust my gut instinct. I suppose this is the rock and roll side of me. For me, it’s about never allowing yourself to stand still.” The word ‘Rove’ stands for traveling, connecting with different cultures. “Being creative means getting inspired by everything, everywhere. All you have to do is open your mind and allow yourself to see things differently. It’s about enjoying life and daring to stand out. This appeals to the bohemian inside of me”.

Morobe

 

Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent In The Picture: Atelier Content

Belgian Shoe Talent

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Atelier Content

Belgian Shoe Talent

Nele Content studies Fashion Design at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent. After graduating in 2008 she worked as a shoe designer for several Belgian labels such as Ambiorix and Cortina for whom she also travelled to Asia to monitor production. In 2014 ATELIER CONTENT was founded in Ronse where she works and follows the production of her collection, which is handcrafted in Italy!

 

 

Exhibition

FootPrint with Jurgi Persoons

Jurgi Persoons, SS97 // Photo by Frédéric Uyttenhove

Jurgi Persoons, SS97 // Photo by Frédéric Uyttenhove

These wooden strapped heeld by Belgian designer Jurgi Persoons, of the SS1997 collection, show that even just heels can be a shoe.

Jurgi Persoons: “When you have bare feet on the ground you feel close to the earth: it’s magic to have bare feet and the posture of the high heel at the same time. all that remains of the shoe is a wooden heel with a small strap.

Footprint: The Track of Shoes in Fashion until 14th February 2016 at MoMu Antwerp!

Exhibition

FootPrint featuring Tabitha Simmons

Photos by Koen de Waal

Craig McDean x Tabitha Simmons. Rocking Out, drummer Meytal Cohen SS 2014 // Photos by Koen de Waal

British shoe designer Tabitha Simmons created colourful, contemporary reinterpretations of the classics, elegant women’s shoe: she returns the glamour of Vivier and Blahnik to the dynamic, modern woman, mixed with dashes of punk and rock ‘n’ roll. The fit is extremely important for this woman designing for other women, making her shoes perfect for dancing.

Footprint: The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion until 14th February 2016 at MoMu Antwerp!

Exhibition

FootPrint featuring Benoît Méléard

Photo by Koen de Waal

Photo by Koen de Waal

 

Benoît Méléard is one of the most innovative and radical shoe designers you might never have heard of, the star behind trailblazing designs for Alexander McQueen and Hussein Chalayan. Under his own name he created the most uncompromising shoes that challenge the idea and concept of a shoe itself. His graphic, absurd and strongly geometric shoes do not keep the shoes from being wearable and comfortable.

Collection O, 1999. Tribute to Leigh Bowery // Photo by Martin Bing

Collection O, 1999. Tribute to Leigh Bowery // Photo by Martin Bing

Méléard makes every shoe by hand and works and reworks the shoes until they fit right. His famous ‘o’ collection was inspired by the late Leigh Bowery, and eccentric superstars like Manada Lepore and Daphne Guinness are large fans of his. His shoes are much appreciated by the lovers of design and some pairs belong to the collection of Musée Galliera and the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris.

Footprint: The Track of Shoes in Fashion until 14th February 2016 at MoMu Antwerp.

Exhibition

MoMu Gift Guide: FootPrint book!

FootPrint Still looking for the perfect Christmas gift? No worries, MoMu has got your back! Our Footprint. The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion is absolutely perfect for all diehard shoelovers. The book includes interviews with renowned designers such as Dries Van Noten, Martin Margiela, Pierre Hardy etc. What are you waiting for? Order it!

Event, Exhibition

Breakfast Talks with Pierre Hardy (Interview)

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho

A couple of days ago, MoMu invited renowned Parisian shoe designer Pierre Hardy to join us for a breakfast talk. Surrounded by people intrigued by the designer, Pierre had a little chat with us about his life as a shoe designer. Having worked for Balenciaga and Hermès, you can say that Pierre Hardy knows a thing or two about the fashion industry. MoMu took the opportunity to ask Pierre a few questions:

You’ve been in the fashion world for two decades now. But you said that fashion is not modern anymore?

No , not modern anymore but not modern enough. For the public, fashion needs to be avant-garde and ahead of its time but I don’t think that fashion is ahead nowadays. There are a lot of recreations and imitations. In the past, designers were more inventive.

During your time at Balenciaga, you’ve designed the Lego heel. It was very popular because Beyoncé wore it but it seemed very different from what you usually design?

Was it a bit too much? I don’t think people nowadays are ready to wear them in their everyday life. It’s too different. People like fun, sexy and glamorous shoes but not adventurous shoes.

Photo by Suzan Rylant

Lego heel by Pierre Hardy // Photo by Suzan Rylant

You started your men’s collection in 2006. Was it because you wanted to make men’s shoes for yourself?

Something like that. I couldn’t find shoes for myself. When I design my men’s collections, I think of myself. It’s kind of selfish. It’s very different from what I’ve been designing for women.

You were a former dancer and studied art. You started as a fashion illustrator. Do you find it important to draw you collection first?

It is very important. Drawing for me is the quickest, easiest and most genuine way to start designing a collection. It allows me to visualize the collection and it also serves as a verification for an idea, to see if it works or not.

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho

Where do you find your inspiration?

It could be everything from colors to museums to building. It’s a chemistry. I cannot explain when, why or what. It’s like falling in love with someone. In a way you can analyze it but you have no idea when it will come to you. Inspiration is a combination of all the things you love, you come across or things that stimulates you.

You work a lot with color blocks but not with prints?

I don’t know why. I don’t like prints. It’s problematic, busy and disturbing. I love clear lines, plain volumes. I try to create a composition with different parts. In the last collection there was a strong print with a paintbrush. It was very graphic. I’m learning it. Same thing with color. I didn’t like color at first. Everything was black and white, preferably all black. Step by step I learned how to use it. Same thing with prints, I need to learn how to do it my way. It takes time.

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho

What is your secret for the perfect pair of heels?

As a designer it is a question of the structure and the balance between the volume of the feet. My work is based on this. If you ask me as a man looking at women, It’s another story. Shoes help people to be  themselves. It makes you better. It can make you look stronger, more confident and sexier. Shoes make you better.

Your shoes are featured in our FootPrint exhibition. Why do people have to visit FootPrint?

The exhibition is very well curated. The organization, the stories, the lighting are well done. Sometimes it’s about the designer or the stories but it’s interesting that in FootPrint it is about the designer and the stories and not one or the other. It’s a perspective of shoes. Also FootPrint does not look at shoes as fashion accessories but as objects of creation. You see all these different types of inspirations and suddenly put together. It’s cleverly done and visually very interesting.

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho

Special thanks to design gallery Valerie Traan and Hotel Julien!

Interview by Christin Ho

Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent in the Picture: Stefan Meuwissen!

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Stefan Meuwissen!

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho

Stefan Meuwissen designs elegant, sophisticated women’s shoes. Each design is handmade in a small factory in northern Italy. The refinement of the shoes lies in the intricate craftmanship and the attention to detail which, for him, are crucial in every part of the process. The harmony between Belgian design and the Italian know-how is not just a pleasant composition. It gives Stefan, as a designer and a brand, the space to create individuality, which is an important requisite for each of his designs!

Photo by Monica Ho

Photo by Monica Ho