Event, Exhibition

Finissage FootPrint & Valentine’s Day at MoMu!

finissage

14th February will be the last day of our Footprint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion exhibition. However, we will end the exhibition in true MoMu style and have a surprise up our sleeves for our lovely visitors! Join us on Valentine’s Day because MoMu will be open until 9pm and organize free guided tours at 6pm and 7pm. Places are very limited! Drop by the museum between 6pm – 9 pm and receive a special Valentine’s treat by Philips’ Biscuits! Let’s end this with a bang!

Stay tuned for our next exhibition Game Changers – Reinventing the 20th Century Silhouette!

Exhibition

MoMu Presents: Game Changers – Reinventing the 20th-Century Silhouette

gamechangerscover

 

The exhibition ‘Game Changers – Reinventing the 20th century silhouette’ looks at the groundbreaking work of fashion designer Cristóbal Balenciaga whose innovations in the middle of the 20th century created a radically new silhouettte, in which the body got freedom of movement and architectural volumes created a space around the body. Along with the pioneers of haute couture in the 1920s and 1930s and later on also the designers of the 1980s and 1990s, Balenciaga provided an alternative for the prevailing constrictive hourglass silhouette. These ‘game changers’ looked at fashion of the 20th century from a new perspective.

Influences from Japan, such as the kimono, liberated women from their tight corsets at the beginning of the 20th century. Fashion designers such as Madeleine Vionnet, Paul Poiret, Coco Chanel en Cristóbal Balenciaga shaped this freedom in the 1920s – 1930s with technical innovations and modern ideas about feminity. At the end of the 20th century, the boundaries of the female silhouette are further explored by Japanese and Belgian designers such as Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, Comme des Garçons, Ann Demeulemeester and Martin Margiela. They paved the way for new body shapes and abstract silhouettes and gave a new interpretation of what could be considered as fashion.

Cristobal Balenciaga, A/W 1967, Photo: Balenciaga Archives

Cristobal Balenciaga, A/W 1967, Photo: Balenciaga Archives

The central figure in the exhibition is the Basque fashion designer Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895-1972), who is seen as the pivotal figure between the two periods, the architect of innovation. His patterns and work are the central axis of the exhibition. Each of the other designers worked in their own way on similarly innovative ideas and shifted the boundaries of the classic feminine silhouette.
In this way, fashion becomes more than a sequence of trends; fashion is a way to shape the body, space and movement. Rei Kawakubo’s ‘Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body‘ collection of SS 1997 shows how these new shapes have become a part of the fashion vocabulary.

“Haute Couture is like an orchestra, whose conductor is Balenciaga. We other couturiers are the musicians and we follow the direction he gives.” Christian Dior

Comme des Garçons, 'Body meets Dress, Dress meets Body', S/S 1997, Photo: Yannis Vlamos

Comme des Garçons, ‘Body meets Dress, Dress meets Body’, S/S 1997, Photo: Yannis Vlamos

 

The exhibition unites 100 unique couture and ready-to-wear silhouettes by Cristóbal Balenciaga, Paul Poiret, Madeleine Vionnet, Gabrielle Chanel, but also Issey Miyake, Ann Demeulemeester, Comme des Garçons, Yohji Yamamoto, Maison Martin Margiela. With loans from prestigious collections of the museum of Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, the V&A, MUDE Lisbon and Musée Galliera.

 

Iris Van Herpen, 'Micro', haute couture S/S 2012, Photo: Ronald Stoops

Iris Van Herpen, ‘Micro’, haute couture S/S 2012, Photo: Ronald Stoops

 

The exhibition will open on 18/03/2016 until 14/08/2016!

 

Event

Poetry Day!

gedichtendag

Today is poetry day! We are surprising our visitors with a poem balloon! Visit MoMu and get inspired!

SPRAAKWATER

Hoe minder woorden stromen

Hoe hoger golven van stilte

Hoe zwijgen tot de lippen stijgt

- Lotte Dodion

Collection, Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent In The Picture: Kim Wille!

Kim Wille

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Kim Wille

Kim Wille

Designer Kim Wille needs to wear orthotic insoles and therefore knows how hard it is to find beautiful and equally comfortable shoes. With an eye for detail and a weakness for fine materials, Kim launched her first three models in August 2015. She designs accessible shoes for a wide audience – with or without feet problems.

SAMSUNG CSC

Uncategorized

MoMu Gallery: Demi-Couture – Couture techniques in recent ready-to-wear acquisitions

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MoMu collection has more than doubled since its opening in 2002. Due to close ties of the museum with the fashion department of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, individual designers and collectors of Belgian fashion, MoMu was able to successfully extend its collection. The museum occasionally receives donations or long term loans from private archives but contemporary fashion is mainly acquired through purchases in the showrooms during fashion weeks.

Within the wide variety of new acquisitions, a returning theme caught the attention: The references to haute couture within the ready-to-wear collections. Haute couture distinguishes itself  from ready-to-wear because the collections are not sold in series but are custom tailored. More importantly everything is still made by hand: The use of traditional techniques like pleating, embroidery and attaching special materials such as sequins, strass, lace and valuable weaves.

These silhouettes are now on display at MoMu Gallery including pieces by Olivier Theyskens, Raf Simons, Bruno Pieters and Peter Pilotto!

Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent In The Picture: Alex Schrijvers

Alex Schrijvers

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Alex Schrijvers

Alex Schrijvers

Alex Schrijvers is a Belgian bag and shoes designer who’s been designing since 2004 and works with exclusive leathers like cod, wolfish and salmon as well as exotic leathers like python or crocodile. All his creations are made in Belgium and custom-made in his Antwerp based store.

Alex Schrijvers

Collection

MoMu Digital Wall receives Henry van de Velde Label!

DigitalWall2

Last Wednesday, the prestigious Henry van de Velde Awards were presented for the 22th time by Design Vlaanderen in Brussels. Nineteen products and services of the past year received the Henry van de Velde 2015 Label, including our very own MoMu Digital Wall.


Design Vlaanderen, an organization promoting high quality and innovative designs in Flanders, has been awarding Henry van de Velde Labels to products since 2006. The Henry van de Velde Label appreciates and promotes innovative, well-developed and technically sophisticated products, objects or projects that stand out from others on the market. More than 200 products participated for the label.

DigitalWall1

With the support of Tourism Flanders , MoMu developed a digital wall of 10 square meters to develop its collection digitally. The digital wall was designed by David Dos Santos. The technical development was in the hands of Lab 101.

Behind the scenes, Library

Study Collection soon available at MoMu!

Studiecollectie MoMu

MoMu will soon launch an exciting new project! We have obtained a fashion and textile study collection with roughly 1000 objects for you to consult! The wide range of items will be made available and hopefully will provide answers to many of your questions regarding patterns, fabrics and techniques.

A large part of the study collection to date was donated to MoMu by Jacoba De Jonge, a private collector of historical costume and accessories. A large part of her collection was acquired by MoMu in 2012. In addition  Mrs de Jonge had a study collection that she used during workshops. This smaller collection of samples of fabrics, laces, embroideries, etc., also came to MoMu to be used for educational and research purposes. This was basis for a larger MoMu study collection that will be accessible for those who have an interest in fashion, fabrics and other textile related techniques.

 

Studiecollectie transport

To enlarge its study collection, and to provide a wider range of types of objects, MoMu engaged in a collaboration with the University of Antwerp and supported by the Flemish government. The training program for conservation-restauration within the Faculty of Design Sciences has many study collections, including one with costumes and textiles. This collection has a completely different content than the one from MoMu, hence the interest in a collaboration.

It was originally donated to the University by the Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.) in New York in 1994. Since then, it has been used by textile conservation students to practice the art of pattern taking and presentation, as well as preservation and conservation techniques. It consists mainly of Western clothing from the 2nd part of the 20th century and traditional and ethnical clothing from all over the world with, for example, a large collection of kimono’s. Some 300 pieces were selected to be included in the MoMu study collection.

Part of the MoMu study collection can already be consulted online through Open Fashion by selecting “Studiecollectie” . The entire study collection will be made physically available for research in September 2016. Leading up to that date, we would like to inform you about the educational importance of the study collections by introducing you to some of the objects contained within, and how they have been used by students at the University of Antwerp.

Words by Bernice Brigou and Natalie Ortega, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Design Sciences, research group Heritage & Sustainability.

Collection, Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent In The Picture: Morobe Shoes

Morobe

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Morobe Shoes

Morobe

Morobé is a Belgian shoe brand based in Antwerp. This luxury label is made for women who long for contemporary elegance and street couture. “With Morobé, we base our outfits on our shoes, not the other way around”. Morobé’s world combines bohemian vibes with rock & roll, giving it a unique and powerful image.

The brand was founded in 2015 and is inspired by the key words ‘Rime and Rove’. Virginie Morobé, designer and owner, feels these words express perfectly how she has grown over the years. ‘Rime’ refers to an evolving state of being: “This new shoe brand is a more mature, more complete version of who I am. During my creative process, I remain very aware of my inner self. I trust my gut instinct. I suppose this is the rock and roll side of me. For me, it’s about never allowing yourself to stand still.” The word ‘Rove’ stands for traveling, connecting with different cultures. “Being creative means getting inspired by everything, everywhere. All you have to do is open your mind and allow yourself to see things differently. It’s about enjoying life and daring to stand out. This appeals to the bohemian inside of me”.

Morobe

 

Exhibition

Belgian Shoe Talent In The Picture: Atelier Content

Belgian Shoe Talent

MoMu and Flanders Fashion Institute have joined forces and are putting Belgian shoe talents in the picture! With MoMu’s ‘FootPrint – The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion’ exhibition and FFI’s #ikkoopbelgisch campaign, the collaboration between MoMu and FFI was the perfect match! Each week from 17th November to 14th February, different contemporary Belgian footwear brands will be displayed in the museum hall. Next up: Atelier Content

Belgian Shoe Talent

Nele Content studies Fashion Design at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent. After graduating in 2008 she worked as a shoe designer for several Belgian labels such as Ambiorix and Cortina for whom she also travelled to Asia to monitor production. In 2014 ATELIER CONTENT was founded in Ronse where she works and follows the production of her collection, which is handcrafted in Italy!